Tag Archives: emotional development

131: Emails & Phone Calls from Teachers



How do you respond to phone calls and emails from teachers about your son’s misbehavior? Excerpts of actual emails I’ve received from my son’s teachers: On Tuesday, Sam was sitting in a chair with his legs on a stool, he was flipping it and turning the stool with his legs and feet. I made eye … Continue reading 131: Emails & Phone Calls from Teachers


129 Grief with Tom Golden



One of our jobs, as parents and educators of boys, is to help them learn how to deal with tough emotions — including grief. As much as we want to, we can’t protect our boys from hurt. Loved ones die. Parents divorce Friends move. Boys fail to achieve important goals, and experience rejection from peers. … Continue reading 129 Grief with Tom Golden


123: The Good News About Bad Behavior with Katherine Reynolds Lewis



  If your kids always do what they’re told, consistently treat others with kindness and never over-react to unintended slights, you can skip this episode. If not — WELCOME! Your child is 100% normal, and you’re going to love this conversation with Jen, Janet and Katherine Reynolds Lewis, author of The Good News About Bad … Continue reading 123: The Good News About Bad Behavior with Katherine Reynolds Lewis


117: Summer Jobs



Does your son have a summer job? Most boys don’t. In 1978, 60% of teens had summer jobs; today, that number hovers between 35 and 40%. Boys today are more likely to spend their days playing sports, brushing up on academics and traveling with family or as part of mission teams. (And playing Fortnite.) Years … Continue reading 117: Summer Jobs


116: Why Risk Is Important for Boys



How comfortable are you with risk? Do you respond with fear or encouragement when your son wants to try something new? How about when you find him climbing atop your tree house? Or doing flips off a public staircase? Adults’ desire to keep boys safe often interferes with boys’ ability to take chances and try … Continue reading 116: Why Risk Is Important for Boys


114: Sleepovers, Camp, and Separation Anxiety



‘Tis the season for sleepaway camp and summer sleepovers! For some parents and kids, though, the prospect of a night away from home is scary. There are so many ‘what-if’s’ that could happen: what if they’re cold? what if they get homesick? what if…what if…what if… But what if you let your kid go anyway? What if … Continue reading 114: Sleepovers, Camp, and Separation Anxiety


113: Lying, Risk, & How to Advocate for Boys (Listener Q&A, Part 2)



Welcome to Part 2 of our first Listener Q & A! This week, Jen & Janet tackle 3 more questions: “What strategies do you use to deal with a sudden increase in lying in pre-teen boys?” “What’s the best way to allow young boys to be adventurous/risky physically while maintaining a clear, safe boundary and … Continue reading 113: Lying, Risk, & How to Advocate for Boys (Listener Q&A, Part 2)


111: Self-Esteem and Boys



According to the Oxford Living Dictionaries, self-esteem is “confidence in one’s own worth or abilities; self-respect.” That’s something we want for our kids. We’re not talking about participation trophies simply for showing up; we’re talking about a true sense of pride that comes for knowledge of your capabilities. Nurturing that kind of self-confidence is a … Continue reading 111: Self-Esteem and Boys


109: Gun Play and Boys



Is Gun Play Really Okay? A generation ago, gun play was an acceptable part of childhood. Parents gave their kids toy guns as gifts — yes, even Red Ryder BB guns! (and yes, that’s A Christmas Story reference) — and boys regularly played Cops and Robbers and War both at school and in the neighborhood. Today, … Continue reading 109: Gun Play and Boys


104: Anger and Boys



“By age 9, the default emotion for most boys is anger.” — Michael Gurian It’s easy to feel overwhelmed and helpless in the face of a boy’s anger, whether you’ve got a toddler throwing a temper tantrum or a teenager on a rampage. But learning to respond to boys’ anger with love and patience is … Continue reading 104: Anger and Boys